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crate dog bed 5

crate dog bed 5

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Give your dog a lift with the orthopedic support and comfort of a patented chew proof dog bed. We add a set of shorter 3” legs to our standard dog bed to allow ample head room for the dog inside the crate. Use the standard length legs (included) when you move the bed out. We offer a wide choice of fabrics and colors to look good in any décor. Match the inside dimensions of your crate to the nearest bed size to select your bed. We do not guarantee that our crate beds will fit in every crate. Crate not included High strength, lightweight frames crafted from furniture-grade poly resin.Includes shorter 3” legs for use in a Crate and a second, standard height set of legs for use outside the crate.Easy to clean and guaranteed to stand up to repeated cleaning.All Fasteners are Stainless SteelSelect your bed by matching the inside dimensions of your crate to the nearest bed size.


I recently adopted a one year old, 17 lb. Cairn Terrier Mix from a local rescue group. Within the first three weeks she completely destroyed three different dog beds including a Kong crate mat that was advertised as chew proof and indestructible. The crate mat lasted less than 6 hours and was reduced to a pile of stuffing and shredded fabric! She ended up spending a week with nothing more than a thick piece of fleece as a crate bed. I researched Kuranda beds and even though the price seemed high I decided it was worth trying rather than replacing her bed every few days. It was a great decision. The bed has been in her crate for over a month now and she has not even put a scratch on the vinyl! I keep her piece of fleece on top of the bed and she uses it to curl up in, as a pillow and even gets underneath it. She loves her new Kuranda and will even go into her crate just to lay down. What a difference this incredible bed has made. She is comfortable and happy and I am thrilled to finally have found a solution. I highly recommend this bed. It is very well made and exactly as advertise. It fit her crate perfectly. What a wonderful product!


Dog Crates, Pens & Gates Though we wish we could take our pets with us everywhere we go, we often times can’t. Dog crates give your pet a place for himself where he can retreat to and feel safe and comforted. Whether it be for when you’re away from home, or just a place to sleep, dog kennels give your dog a safe space of his own. By starting crate training early on, your dog will learn to enjoy his time in a crate without feeling distressed or panicked. Chewy offers a variety of crate mats that allow your dog to be more comfortable and make his cage feel homier. For some dogs, pens may be used as an alternative to crates, or can be used as a supervised play area. Whether used indoors or outdoors, dog pens create a fenced in area for play without the tight confinement of a cage. If you have an area of your home that your pet should not be visiting and you would like to restrict access from, maybe an in-home gate would be right for you! Our range of gates allows you to choose a design that will match your home’s décor and fit your needs.


Though we wish we could take our pets with us everywhere we go, we often times can’t. Dog crates give your pet a place for himself where he can retreat to and feel safe and comforted. Whether it be for when you’re away from home, or just a place to sleep, dog kennels give your dog a safe space of his own. By starting crate training early on, your dog will learn to enjoy his time in a crate without feeling distressed or panicked. Chewy offers a variety of crate mats that allow your dog to be more comfortable and make his cage feel homier. For some dogs, pens may be used as an alternative to crates, or can be used as a supervised play area. Whether used indoors or outdoors, dog pens create a fenced in area for play without the tight confinement of a cage. If you have an area of your home that your pet should not be visiting and you would like to restrict access from, maybe an in-home gate would be right for you! Our range of gates allows you to choose a design that will match your home’s décor and fit your needs.


Yes, you can use a crate for time-outs without causing “crate-hate.” Do you like your bedroom? Sure you do—even if you don’t want to be there on a Friday night. Your dog can like his crate too, even if he doesn’t want to be there while scheming to scam some chicken off the dining room table. Crates are okay for time-outs, because it isn’t the crate that is punishing… it is the loss of freedom in the middle of fun times that is punishing (see my Summer 2004 article for more on rewards and punishment). The same reasoning extends to children: they can be sent to their room as a consequence for misbehaviour without learning to fear or hate their room. Your dog will only become afraid of his crate if bad things happen while he is in there—so never scold him while he is inside. Time-outs don't need to be long; 30 seconds to 3 minutes is plenty. And don’t forget to give your Cool Hand Luke a clean slate once he’s done his time… no grudge-holding allowed!


Spoil your pooch with a comfy dog crate bed. Crate pads turn your dog's kennel into a cozy hideaway. Available in different sizes, styles, and materials, versatile dog crate mats can be used in crates, carriers, dog houses, vehicles, or anywhere in your home.


Crates are not bad in theory. Like most things they are only bad when abused. My dogs enjoy their crates and frequently go in when they are not required to. My older dog is allowed to stay in the open when we are not home but we generally find him in his crate when we get home. My younger dog needs to be in his crate as he could easily escape any "pen" that wasn't close in on all sides, which makes it a crate, because he would get into things and could very easily hurt himself. How is a "pen" not just as much of a jail as a crate? How is this a tragedy? My dogs are well exercised, well fed, and well loved and happy. Most nights they sleep in our bed with us. We use the crates for their own protection and there is nothing wrong with it. It think it is much worse the people that force their dogs to be "outside" dogs no matter how hot or how cold it is outside.


My dog Max and I love the Kuranda crate bed. It was pretty easy to assemble, and fits perfectly into the crate. Max does not resist going into his crate at night, and I'm pretty sure he's sleeping better, as I don't hear a peep from him until morning! Max is a very stronger chewer and I had tried numerous other "indestructible" beds, and every one was chewed up within a day or two. If you are on the fence about the cost and have a dog that is a destructive chewer, then you need to give the Kuranda bed a shot. It was well worth the investment. I'm considering a second bed for another room in the house, so maybe Max will stay off the sofa! Haha.


LTHQ September 16, 2014 at 9:15 pmHi Nat,It sounds to me like your Lab isn’t yet fully crate trained and hasn’t yet learnt to love his crate. Spend more time going through the crate training exercises in my guide. Until he is comfortably and happily spending extended time in there, he isn’t yet fully crate trained and might still prefer not to be in there. So you still have some work to do with his crate training by the sound of it. Reply


Hi Nat,It sounds to me like your Lab isn’t yet fully crate trained and hasn’t yet learnt to love his crate. Spend more time going through the crate training exercises in my guide. Until he is comfortably and happily spending extended time in there, he isn’t yet fully crate trained and might still prefer not to be in there. So you still have some work to do with his crate training by the sound of it.


Puppies are introduced to crates quite easily by tossing food-stuffed chewtoys inside when they are hungry and letting them work away while someone familiar is nearby. Gradually they can be left on their own with the door closed, and many will readily go to their crate voluntarily for naps or in the hopes that a stuffed chewtoy will miraculously appear. Adult dogs without any crate experience can be trained to like a crate in the same manner, but it may take longer; and the guidance of a pet behaviour counsellor is sometimes required if the dog is anxious about entering. A great trick for dogs of all ages is to lock dinner inside the crate until poochie is throwing a major tantrum wanting to go inside… then you can open the door and let him in for a yummy meal. He probably won’t even notice when you close the door.